About Us

Renewable Engine is an exciting €6.1m cross-border Research & Innovation project aimed at facilitating direct knowledge transfer and technology development within the Advanced Manufacturing and Renewable Energy sectors.  Research themes focus on Energy Generation, Energy Storage and enabling technologies, including Industry 4.0 and Augmented Reality.  Renewable Engine involves an internationally recognised cross-border research super-cluster involving four research institutes.  Led by South West College, Renewable Engine operates across a network of research institutes including Queen’s University Belfast, Institute of Technology Sligo and the University of Strathclyde’s High-Value Manufacturing Catapult.  The project delivers dedicated research support to industry through 12 PhD researchers and a further 4 postdoctoral researchers, bridging the “innovation gap” typically observed between academic and commercial entities.

The project exists across the eligible region of Northern Ireland, Border Region of Ireland and Western Scotland and is supported by the European Union’s INTERREG VA Programme, managed by the Special EU Programmes Body (SEUPB), with match funding provided by the Department for the Economy (Northern Ireland) and Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation (Republic of Ireland).  The €283m INTERREG VA Programme is one of 60 similar funding programmes across the European Union that have been designed to help overcome the issues that arise from the existence of a border.  These issues range from access to transport, health and social care services, environmental issues and enterprise development.  Since 1991 the INTERREG Programme has brought in approximately €1.13 billion into the region.  This funding has been used to finance thousands of projects that support strategic cross-border co-operation in order to create a more prosperous and sustainable region.

Renewable Engine Specific Objectives

Develop an internationally recognised cross-border research super-cluster in Renewable Energy and Advanced Manufacturing technologies.

Facilitate direct knowledge transfer, technology development and innovation within the Renewable Energy Sector through the provision of R&I support and technology development grants to industry partners.

Develop a novel programme of applied industrial research, based on identified industry need, at PhD level and above.

Co-ordinate an international board of renewable energy stakeholders to drive innovative forward-looking applied industrial research and initiate policy dialogue.

Increase knowledge and awareness, within industry in the cross-border region, of the Research & Innovation infrastructure in the Renewable Energy sector.

May4

Could Polymer Foams Help in Solving the Global Energy Crisis?

Exciting research being conducted at QUB in collaboration with Kingspan Water & Energy aims to assist rotational moulders in the manufacturing of viable large-scale offshore wave energy generation devices.  By learning more about the development of polymer foams, it is hoped that larger, more robust, and complex structures could be manufactured using the process in … Continued

April6

Understanding Composite Structures in Rotational Moulding

The race to find a new alternative to produce renewable energy has begun a long time ago, but limitations in the way we manufacture products affects the development of new prototypes.  Rotational moulding is the forgotten manufacturing technology that has the potential to produce large structures, like those needed in renewable energy generation.  The principle … Continued


The project is supported by the European Union’s INTERREG VA Programme, managed by the Special EU Programmes Body (SEUPB), with match funding provided by the Department for the Economy (Northern Ireland) and Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation (Republic of Ireland).
Interreg - Northern Ireland - Ireland - Scotland - European Regional Development Fund

Our PhD Researcher Charlie has a new cross-border paper published online - great work! 👍🏻🌍#circulareconomy https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364032120302021